Blog: Coronavirus

Welcome to LCBH’s Blog. Our blog delivers original articles written by our staff, interns and volunteers. We strive to provide informative stories about the work we do on behalf of Chicago renters and the issues renters face.

  • Renting During COVID-19 Frequently Asked Questions
  • Should I tell my landlord if I can’t pay rent?
  • Can I be evicted during the COVID-19 emergency?
  • What does the CARES Act do, and who is covered by it?
  • What do I do If I already have an eviction case filed against me?
  • Should I participate in a rent strike if I can afford to pay my rent?
  • Can my landlord come into my apartment for an in-person showing?
  • Can I move to another apartment during COVID-19?
  • Can my landlord ask me questions to find out if I’m sick, work in healthcare, or an industry that has been severely impacted by COVID-19?
  • Can my Landlord bar non-residents from coming into my apartment building?
  • What do I do if my lease ends soon, and my landlord gave me a Non-Renewal Notice?
  • Can my utilities be shut off if I can’t pay?
  • What do I do if my home needs an emergency repair?

Statement of Support for HB 5574, House Amendment No. 1

COVID-19 Emergency and Economic Recovery Renter and Homeowner Protection Act

Following is LCBH’s statement of support for HB 5574, House Amendment No. 1, the COVID-19 Emergency and Economic Recovery Renter and Homeowner Protection Act.

Lawyers’ Committee for Better Housing (LCBH) is one of the few legal aid organizations in Chicago that provides free legal assistance to working-class and low-income tenant families. Though LCBH represents primarily Chicago tenants, we are all too aware of the widespread perils of eviction court and the scars that housing instability and forced displacement can leave on a family and a community.

Money is certainly needed to maintain housing. But if we ignore tenants’ due process rights and the devastating effects of eviction, Illinois will face an unprecedented crisis that will devastate the housing market and lead to homelessness and housing instability for thousands. Around 57,000 eviction cases are normally filed in Illinois every year, with almost two-thirds of those cases arising outside of Chicago. Yet today, over 605,000 Illinois renters are expected to suffer from COVID-19-related income and job loss. Eviction filings and homelessness are likely to astronomically increase across the State unless tenants are provided with protections that extend beyond mere financial assistance. Passing HB 5574 is necessary to preserve the housing market, safeguard public health, and ensure that Illinois can recover from this crisis.

On March 13th, 2020, Chief Judge Timothy C. Evans of the Circuit Court of Cook County issued General Administrative Order 2020-01, which lays out the emergency measures being taken by the court to address widespread concerns about transmission of COVID-19. The order communicates important information for tenants who are facing eviction, or are currently involved in eviction proceedings:

Rentervention - Housing Problems Solved

In response to the public health crisis, Lawyers' Committee for Better Housing (LCBH) has closed its office to the public until further notice. LCBH staff is working remotely, and LCBH is still taking applications by phone at 312-347-7600. However, the quickest way to get help if you have a problem with a housing issue and see if you qualify for legal representation is to visit www.rentervention.com to start a conversation with Rentervention, and Renny, LCBH’s bot.

The Circuit Court of Cook County has also announced that most civil legal cases like evictions will be postponed for 30 days starting tomorrow, Tuesday, March 17th, through April 15th, and no eviction orders will be entered during this time. Additionally, Sheriff Tom Dart has announced that the Sheriff’s Office will not be enforcing Eviction Orders until further notice.

Keep in mind that even though courts may not be hearing eviction cases, renters should still be responsive to any lawful notices (5-day or 10-day notices) so that they can remain in their homes after this public health crisis passes.